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Let Us Remember 9/11


~By Sharon Czerwien


Perhaps you have been asked numerous times, “Where were you on 9/11?” While I do not consider myself old, I sure feel a bit old when I chat with young adults who have no recollection of the events on that early September morning.



In September of 2001, I was young and in college. On 9/11, I was at home, in our old green recliner, studying for my courses when my mom called me from her work. She told me to turn on the television, as something terrible was happening in different places of our great country.


Though it was a numbing feeling, I was nowhere close to understanding the full picture. Shortly after my mom's phone call, I had to go to my job at McDonald’s. These plane crashes were the main discussion, and unfortunately, the news did not get any better.


Not long after, all airplanes were grounded. Then, I heard the awful and shocking news that my friend’s dad from high school died suddenly while in another country. Years before, this man had been a guest speaker at our Christian high school on several occasions, and I respected him. Because of the airplanes being grounded, I remember going to his Memorial Service. It was not a funeral, as there was no body; it was sadly stuck overseas for a time.


Between 9/11 (and watching so much news) and this particular death, I remember being in a strange hazy state for a short time. Even when I was back to normal, there were still specific aspects of 9/11 that brought me to tears. Whether it was watching a made-for-tv movie about the day or reading Let’s Roll by Lisa Beamer, whose husband was on United Flight 93, I remember the amount of tears that I shed.


I do not want to forget 9/11. America’s loved ones lost, co-workers killed, first responders emotionally or physically scarred for life, military deployed and more families grieved…I do not want to forget.


I do not want to forget the sad feelings I had either. I want to remember, but not because I want to base my life on feelings. I want to show care and concern for others. I desire to empathize with military and first responder spouses and family. I want to be able to care deeply about and pray for those who are still affected by the trauma of that dreadful 9/11 morning.


Praise God, even through our tears, HE attends to our prayers! Here is an encouraging set of verses to ponder on this day of remembrance:


Hear my cry, O God; attend to my prayer. From the end of the earth I will cry to You, when my heart is overwhelmed; lead me to the rock that is higher than I” (Psalm 61:1-2, NKJV).

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